Posts tagged Nissan CVT Failure
Nissan CVT Class Action Stayed Pending Preliminary Approval

Nissan is pretty well known for its problematic Jatco CVT Transmissions and there are no fewer than four different class actions covering the:

  1. 2011-2017 Nissan Senra

  2. 2011-2017 Nissan Versa

  3. 2011-2017 Nissan Versa Note

  4. 2011-2017 Nissan Juke

Currently, all four class actions are ‘stayed’ pending approval of the proposed Class Action Settlement. A preliminary approval hearing date has not been set yet by the court yet.

Nissan CVT Warranty Extension

Nissan CVT Warranty Extension

If you're in California and you’ve taken your CVT equipped Nissan vehicle to a dealership for any issue, ranging from transmission stalling, transmission failure, overheating, or any other warranty concern, we can help you…. AT NO COST TO YOU! Valero Law, APC is a California consumer protection firm dedicated to protecting the lemon law rights of California consumers and ALL cases are taken on a contingency basis, meaning if there is no recovery, there is absolutely no fee to you! Feel free to call at 424-299-4447 for a free case evaluation!

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New Nissan Sentra and Nissan Versa CVT Judder TSB

While not a warranty extension like those offered for 2003-2009 CVT Equipped Nissan Vehicles, this is helpful for those who have have either a 2013-2017 Nissan Sentra or a 2014-2017 Nissan Versa Note with a CVT Transmission. This is version H of the technical service bulletin, which presumably means that there were 7 (SEVEN!) prior versions.

The TSB is titled “2013-2017 SENTRA AND VERSA SEDAN, AND 2014-2017 VERSA NOTE; CVT JUDDER AND/OR P0746/P0965/P17F0/P0846 STORED” and it was released on February 15, 2019. It states that if you’ve been having the following issues:

The customer reports a transmission judder (shake, shudder, single or multiple bumps or vibration), hesitation on acceleration, lack of power or RPM flare.

Then the TSB should be applied to the vehicle.

valero law nissan cvt TSB transmission

If you’re in California and you’ve had warranty work done to your Nissan CVT transmission, you may be better off filing an individual lemon law claim. If you're in California and you’ve taken your CVT equipped Nissan vehicle to a dealership for any issue, ranging from transmission stalling, transmission failure, overheating, or any other warranty concern, we can help you…. AT NO COST TO YOU! Valero Law, APC is a California consumer protection firm dedicated to protecting the lemon law rights of California consumers and ALL cases are taken on a contingency basis, meaning if there is no recovery, there is absolutely no fee to you! Feel free to call at 424-299-4447 for a free case evaluation!

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Nissan Altima CVT Class Action nears Settlement

A class action concerning the CVT transmission in 2013-2016 Nissan Altima’s (Elisa Cabebe vs. Nissan of North America, Inc) is nearing settlement as parties representing the plaintiff here submitted a Proposed Settlement for the federal court to review and sign off on. With that, there are more than a few hurdles potential class members have to jump through, namely:

… a Class Member must satisfy in order to be eligible to receive a reimbursement for a Qualifying Repair pursuant to the terms of this Settlement Agreement, which are:

  1. the Class Member must be a current or former owner or lessee of a Class Vehicle as of the Notice Date;

  2. the Class Member actually paid for a Qualifying Repair; and

  3. the Class Member must submit to the Settlement Administrator within the applicable Claims Period

    1. a properly completed Claim Form with a proper VIN;

    2. an affirmation under penalty of perjury that the Class Member (i) is a current or former owner or lessee of the Class Vehicle identified on the Claim Form and (ii) is not seeking reimbursement for any portion of the Qualifying Repairs previously paid for by NNA or by an extended warranty or service contract provider; and

    3. all necessary supporting documentation which is:

      1. Appropriate Contemporaneous Documentation of Qualifying Repair establishing that (i) a Qualifying Repair was made; (ii) the Class Member paid for the Qualifying Repair; (iii) the amount paid for the Qualifying Repair; (iv) the vehicle’s mileage at the time of the Qualifying Repair; and (v) the date of the Qualifying Repair. B.

      2. Additionally, for a Qualifying Repair made after expiration of the Warranty Extension but within the time frame described in Paragraph 59, Appropriate Contemporaneous Documentation of Nissan Diagnosis establishing that (i) an authorized Nissan dealer diagnosed and recommended a repair to the transmission assembly or ATCU; (ii) the vehicle’s mileage at the time of the diagnosis and recommendation was within the Warranty Extension Period; and (iii) the date on which the diagnosis and recommendation was made which was within the Warranty Extension Period.

Needless to say, there are more than a few hurdles to jump through here, not including the fact that the Judge still has to approve the settlement. The ‘benefits’ of the class action are:

If you are a Class Member, you could receive one of the following benefits if the Settlement is approved:

  1. Warranty Extension. Nissan will extend the terms of the Nissan New Vehicle Limited Warranty for the transmission assembly (including the valve body and torque converter) and Automatic Transmission Control Unit (“ATCU”) in all Class Vehicles by twenty-four (24) months or twenty-four thousand (24,000) miles, whichever occurs first (the “Warranty Extension”). The Warranty Extension will be subject to the terms and conditions of the original New Vehicle Limited Warranty applicable to the Class Vehicle.

  2. Reimbursement for Replacement of or Repair to Transmission Assembly or ATCU. Nissan will reimburse Class Members for parts and labor actually paid by the Class Member for qualifying repairs involving the replacement of or repair to the transmission assembly or ATCU of their Class Vehicle if the work was done after the expiration of the powertrain coverage under the original New Vehicle Limited Warranty but within the durational limits of the Warranty Extension. If the replacement or repair was performed by a Nissan dealer, the full amount the Class Member paid will be reimbursed. If the repair or replacement was performed by a nonNissan automotive repair facility, Nissan will reimburse up to $5,000 for that repair or replacement. In both cases, the replacement or repair must have occurred on or before the Class Vehicle has been in service for eighty-four (84) months or been driven for eighty-four thousand (84,000) miles, whichever occurs first. If you paid for more repairs on more than one occasion, you can be reimbursed for all qualifying repairs subject to the above limits. For more information, see Question 8 below.

  3. Voucher Towards Purchase or Lease of a New Vehicle. Former owners of Class Vehicles who had two (2) or more replacements or repairs to the transmission assembly or ATCU during their ownership experience (as reflected by NNA warranty records) are eligible for a Voucher in the amount of $1,000 for either a purchase or lease of a single new Nissan or Infiniti vehicle. Prior software updates and/or reprogramming do not count as a prior repair. The election to apply the Voucher toward the purchase or lease of a single new Nissan or Infiniti vehicle must be exercised within nine (9) months of the Effective Date of this Settlement. The Voucher is not transferable. Class Members eligible for a Voucher but also eligible for reimbursement of a qualifying repair must elect either to receive the Voucher or to receive reimbursement; you cannot receive both.

There is NOT an option to have the vehicle repurchased from you, nor an option to receive a replacement vehicle. Furthermore, further claims must be submitted through the BBB.

All in all, if you’re in California and you’ve had warranty work done to your Nissan CVT transmission, you may be better off filing an individual lemon law claim. If you're in California and you’ve taken your CVT equipped Nissan vehicle to a dealership for any issue, ranging from transmission stalling, transmission failure, overheating, or any other warranty concern, we can help you…. AT NO COST TO YOU!  Valero Law, APC is a California consumer protection firm dedicated to protecting the lemon law rights of California consumers and ALL cases are taken on a contingency basis, meaning if there is no recovery, there is absolutely no fee to you!  Feel free to call at 424-299-4447 for a free case evaluation!

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Nissan Sentra CVT Problems

California consumers are still experiencing issues with the problematic JATCO CVT transmissions in the Sentra, Versa, Juke,  Note, Pathfinder and Altima.  While Nissan did extend the warranty on the 2003-2010 models, Nissan later completely removed all reference to that warranty extension from their web page.  T

Common complaints in CVT equipped Nissans are:

  • Sudden shaking and violent jerking when drivers accelerate.

  • Lag or delay when the driver tries to accelerate.

  • Hard deceleration or “clunk” when drivers slow down or accelerate at low speeds.

  • Complete transmission failures and replacements.

A startling problem here is that, once out of warranty, it can cost approximately $4,000 to have the problematic CVT replaced AND, generally, dealerships often have trouble verifying the symptoms until it's too late!

The good news here is that, if you're in California and you’ve taken your CVT equipped Nissan vehicle to a dealership for any issue, ranging from transmission stalling, transmission failure, overheating, or any other warranty concern, we can help you…. AT NO COST TO YOU!  Valero Law, APC is a California consumer protection firm dedicated to protecting the lemon law rights of California consumers and ALL cases are taken on a contingency basis, meaning if there is no recovery, there is absolutely no fee to you!  Feel free to call at 424-299-4447 for a free case evaluation!

Your Legal Rights - Lemon Law - Podcast

KALW radio in San Francisco recently hosted a podcast about California Lemon Law and it is a delightful listen for anyone curious about the California Lemon Law. It’s only an hour long and goes by far too quickly. If you’re interesting in listening, feel free to click here.

Also, here is the relevant Civil Code text of California Lemon Law, with some parts in bold for emphasis by me

1793.2. (a) Every manufacturer of consumer goods sold in this state and for which the manufacturer has made an express warranty shall:

(1) (A) Maintain in this state sufficient service and repair facilities reasonably close to all areas where its consumer goods are sold to carry out the terms of those warranties or designate and authorize in this state as service and repair facilities independent repair or service facilities reasonably close to all areas where its consumer goods are sold to carry out the terms of the warranties.

(B) As a means of complying with this paragraph, a manufacturer may enter into warranty service contracts with independent service and repair facilities. The warranty service contracts may provide for a fixed schedule of rates to be charged for warranty service or warranty repair work. However, the rates fixed by those contracts shall be in conformity with the requirements of subdivision (c) of Section 1793.3. The rates established pursuant to subdivision (c) of Section 1793.3, between the manufacturer and the independent service and repair facility, do not preclude a good faith discount that is reasonably related to reduced credit and general overhead cost factors arising from the manufacturer’s payment of warranty charges direct to the independent service and repair facility. The warranty service contracts authorized by this paragraph may not be executed to cover a period of time in excess of one year, and may be renewed only by a separate, new contract or letter of agreement between the manufacturer and the independent service and repair facility.

(2) In the event of a failure to comply with paragraph (1) of this subdivision, be subject to Section 1793.5.

(3) Make available to authorized service and repair facilities sufficient service literature and replacement parts to effect repairs during the express warranty period.

(b) Where those service and repair facilities are maintained in this state and service or repair of the goods is necessary because they do not conform with the applicable express warranties, service and repair shall be commenced within a reasonable time by the manufacturer or its representative in this state. Unless the buyer agrees in writing to the contrary, the goods shall be serviced or repaired so as to conform to the applicable warranties within 30 days. Delay caused by conditions beyond the control of the manufacturer or its representatives shall serve to extend this 30-day requirement. Where delay arises, conforming goods shall be tendered as soon as possible following termination of the condition giving rise to the delay.

(c) The buyer shall deliver nonconforming goods to the manufacturer’s service and repair facility within this state, unless, due to reasons of size and weight, or method of attachment, or method of installation, or nature of the nonconformity, delivery cannot reasonably be accomplished. If the buyer cannot return the nonconforming goods for any of these reasons, he or she shall notify the manufacturer or its nearest service and repair facility within the state. Written notice of nonconformity to the manufacturer or its service and repair facility shall constitute return of the goods for purposes of this section. Upon receipt of that notice of nonconformity, the manufacturer shall, at its option, service or repair the goods at the buyer’s residence, or pick up the goods for service and repair, or arrange for transporting the goods to its service and repair facility. All reasonable costs of transporting the goods when a buyer cannot return them for any of the above reasons shall be at the manufacturer’s expense. The reasonable costs of transporting nonconforming goods after delivery to the service and repair facility until return of the goods to the buyer shall be at the manufacturer’s expense.

(d) (1) Except as provided in paragraph (2), if the manufacturer or its representative in this state does not service or repair the goods to conform to the applicable express warranties after a reasonable number of attempts, the manufacturer shall either replace the goods or reimburse the buyer in an amount equal to the purchase price paid by the buyer, less that amount directly attributable to use by the buyer prior to the discovery of the nonconformity.

(2) If the manufacturer or its representative in this state is unable to service or repair a new motor vehicle, as that term is defined in paragraph (2) of subdivision (e) of Section 1793.22, to conform to the applicable express warranties after a reasonable number of attempts, the manufacturer shall either promptly replace the new motor vehicle in accordance with subparagraph (A) or promptly make restitution to the buyer in accordance with subparagraph (B). However, the buyer shall be free to elect restitution in lieu of replacement, and in no event shall the buyer be required by the manufacturer to accept a replacement vehicle.

(A) In the case of replacement, the manufacturer shall replace the buyer’s vehicle with a new motor vehicle substantially identical to the vehicle replaced. The replacement vehicle shall be accompanied by all express and implied warranties that normally accompany new motor vehicles of that specific kind. The manufacturer also shall pay for, or to, the buyer the amount of any sales or use tax, license fees, registration fees, and other official fees which the buyer is obligated to pay in connection with the replacement, plus any incidental damages to which the buyer is entitled under Section 1794, including, but not limited to, reasonable repair, towing, and rental car costs actually incurred by the buyer.

(B) In the case of restitution, the manufacturer shall make restitution in an amount equal to the actual price paid or payable by the buyer, including any charges for transportation and manufacturer-installed options, but excluding nonmanufacturer items installed by a dealer or the buyer, and including any collateral charges such as sales or use tax, license fees, registration fees, and other official fees, plus any incidental damages to which the buyer is entitled under Section 1794, including, but not limited to, reasonable repair, towing, and rental car costs actually incurred by the buyer.

(C) When the manufacturer replaces the new motor vehicle pursuant to subparagraph (A), the buyer shall only be liable to pay the manufacturer an amount directly attributable to use by the buyer of the replaced vehicle prior to the time the buyer first delivered the vehicle to the manufacturer or distributor, or its authorized service and repair facility for correction of the problem that gave rise to the nonconformity. When restitution is made pursuant to subparagraph (B), the amount to be paid by the manufacturer to the buyer may be reduced by the manufacturer by that amount directly attributable to use by the buyer prior to the time the buyer first delivered the vehicle to the manufacturer or distributor, or its authorized service and repair facility for correction of the problem that gave rise to the nonconformity. The amount directly attributable to use by the buyer shall be determined by multiplying the actual price of the new motor vehicle paid or payable by the buyer, including any charges for transportation and manufacturer-installed options, by a fraction having as its denominator 120,000 and having as its numerator the number of miles traveled by the new motor vehicle prior to the time the buyer first delivered the vehicle to the manufacturer or distributor, or its authorized service and repair facility for correction of the problem that gave rise to the nonconformity. Nothing in this paragraph shall in any way limit the rights or remedies available to the buyer under any other law.

(D) Pursuant to Section 1795.4, a buyer of a new motor vehicle shall also include a lessee of a new motor vehicle.

(e) (1) If the goods cannot practicably be serviced or repaired by the manufacturer or its representative to conform to the applicable express warranties because of the method of installation or because the goods have become so affixed to real property as to become a part thereof, the manufacturer shall either replace and install the goods or reimburse the buyer in an amount equal to the purchase price paid by the buyer, including installation costs, less that amount directly attributable to use by the buyer prior to the discovery of the nonconformity.

(2) With respect to claims arising out of deficiencies in the construction of a new residential dwelling, paragraph (1) shall not apply to either of the following:

(A) A product that is not a manufactured product, as defined in subdivision (g) of Section 896.

(B) A claim against a person or entity that is not the manufacturer that originally made the express warranty for that manufactured product.

(Amended by Stats. 2011, Ch. 727, Sec. 1. (AB 242) Effective January 1, 2012.)

1793.22. (a) This section shall be known and may be cited as the Tanner Consumer Protection Act.

(b) It shall be presumed that a reasonable number of attempts have been made to conform a new motor vehicle to the applicable express warranties if, within 18 months from delivery to the buyer or 18,000 miles on the odometer of the vehicle, whichever occurs first, one or more of the following occurs:

(1) The same nonconformity results in a condition that is likely to cause death or serious bodily injury if the vehicle is driven and the nonconformity has been subject to repair two or more times by the manufacturer or its agents, and the buyer or lessee has at least once directly notified the manufacturer of the need for the repair of the nonconformity.

(2) The same nonconformity has been subject to repair four or more times by the manufacturer or its agents and the buyer has at least once directly notified the manufacturer of the need for the repair of the nonconformity.

(3) The vehicle is out of service by reason of repair of nonconformities by the manufacturer or its agents for a cumulative total of more than 30 calendar days since delivery of the vehicle to the buyer. The 30-day limit shall be extended only if repairs cannot be performed due to conditions beyond the control of the manufacturer or its agents. The buyer shall be required to directly notify the manufacturer pursuant to paragraphs (1) and (2) only if the manufacturer has clearly and conspicuously disclosed to the buyer, with the warranty or the owner’s manual, the provisions of this section and that of subdivision (d) of Section 1793.2, including the requirement that the buyer must notify the manufacturer directly pursuant to paragraphs (1) and (2). The notification, if required, shall be sent to the address, if any, specified clearly and conspicuously by the manufacturer in the warranty or owner’s manual. This presumption shall be a rebuttable presumption affecting the burden of proof, and it may be asserted by the buyer in any civil action, including an action in small claims court, or other formal or informal proceeding.

(c) If a qualified third-party dispute resolution process exists, and the buyer receives timely notification in writing of the availability of that qualified third-party dispute resolution process with a description of its operation and effect, the presumption in subdivision (b) may not be asserted by the buyer until after the buyer has initially resorted to the qualified third-party dispute resolution process as required in subdivision (d). Notification of the availability of the qualified third-party dispute resolution process is not timely if the buyer suffers any prejudice resulting from any delay in giving the notification. If a qualified third-party dispute resolution process does not exist, or if the buyer is dissatisfied with that third-party decision, or if the manufacturer or its agent neglects to promptly fulfill the terms of the qualified third-party dispute resolution process decision after the decision is accepted by the buyer, the buyer may assert the presumption provided in subdivision (b) in an action to enforce the buyer’s rights under subdivision (d) of Section 1793.2. The findings and decision of a qualified third-party dispute resolution process shall be admissible in evidence in the action without further foundation. Any period of limitation of actions under any federal or California laws with respect to any person shall be extended for a period equal to the number of days between the date a complaint is filed with a third-party dispute resolution process and the date of its decision or the date before which the manufacturer or its agent is required by the decision to fulfill its terms if the decision is accepted by the buyer, whichever occurs later.

(d) A qualified third-party dispute resolution process shall be one that does all of the following:

(1) Complies with the minimum requirements of the Federal Trade Commission for informal dispute settlement procedures as set forth in Part 703 of Title 16 of the Code of Federal Regulations, as those regulations read on January 1, 1987.

(2) Renders decisions which are binding on the manufacturer if the buyer elects to accept the decision.

(3) Prescribes a reasonable time, not to exceed 30 days after the decision is accepted by the buyer, within which the manufacturer or its agent must fulfill the terms of its decisions.

(4) Provides arbitrators who are assigned to decide disputes with copies of, and instruction in, the provisions of the Federal Trade Commission’s regulations in Part 703 of Title 16 of the Code of Federal Regulations as those regulations read on January 1, 1987, Division 2 (commencing with Section 2101) of the Commercial Code, and this chapter.

(5) Requires the manufacturer, when the process orders, under the terms of this chapter, either that the nonconforming motor vehicle be replaced if the buyer consents to this remedy or that restitution be made to the buyer, to replace the motor vehicle or make restitution in accordance with paragraph (2) of subdivision (d) of Section 1793.2.

(6) Provides, at the request of the arbitrator or a majority of the arbitration panel, for an inspection and written report on the condition of a nonconforming motor vehicle, at no cost to the buyer, by an automobile expert who is independent of the manufacturer.

(7) Takes into account, in rendering decisions, all legal and equitable factors, including, but not limited to, the written warranty, the rights and remedies conferred in regulations of the Federal Trade Commission contained in Part 703 of Title 16 of the Code of Federal Regulations as those regulations read on January 1, 1987, Division 2 (commencing with Section 2101) of the Commercial Code, this chapter, and any other equitable considerations appropriate in the circumstances. Nothing in this chapter requires that, to be certified as a qualified third-party dispute resolution process pursuant to this section, decisions of the process must consider or provide remedies in the form of awards of punitive damages or multiple damages, under subdivision (c) of Section 1794, or of attorneys’ fees under subdivision (d) of Section 1794, or of consequential damages other than as provided in subdivisions (a) and (b) of Section 1794, including, but not limited to, reasonable repair, towing, and rental car costs actually incurred by the buyer.

(8) Requires that no arbitrator deciding a dispute may be a party to the dispute and that no other person, including an employee, agent, or dealer for the manufacturer, may be allowed to participate substantively in the merits of any dispute with the arbitrator unless the buyer is allowed to participate also. Nothing in this subdivision prohibits any member of an arbitration board from deciding a dispute.

(9) Obtains and maintains certification by the Department of Consumer Affairs pursuant to Chapter 9 (commencing with Section 472) of Division 1 of the Business and Professions Code.

(e) For the purposes of subdivision (d) of Section 1793.2 and this section, the following terms have the following meanings:

(1) “Nonconformity” means a nonconformity which substantially impairs the use, value, or safety of the new motor vehicle to the buyer or lessee.

(2) “New motor vehicle” means a new motor vehicle that is bought or used primarily for personal, family, or household purposes. “New motor vehicle” also means a new motor vehicle with a gross vehicle weight under 10,000 pounds that is bought or used primarily for business purposes by a person, including a partnership, limited liability company, corporation, association, or any other legal entity, to which not more than five motor vehicles are registered in this state. “New motor vehicle” includes the chassis, chassis cab, and that portion of a motor home devoted to its propulsion, but does not include any portion designed, used, or maintained primarily for human habitation, a dealer-owned vehicle and a “demonstrator” or other motor vehicle sold with a manufacturer’s new car warranty but does not include a motorcycle or a motor vehicle which is not registered under the Vehicle Code because it is to be operated or used exclusively off the highways. A demonstrator is a vehicle assigned by a dealer for the purpose of demonstrating qualities and characteristics common to vehicles of the same or similar model and type.

(3) “Motor home” means a vehicular unit built on, or permanently attached to, a self-propelled motor vehicle chassis, chassis cab, or van, which becomes an integral part of the completed vehicle, designed for human habitation for recreational or emergency occupancy.

(f) (1) Except as provided in paragraph (2), no person shall sell, either at wholesale or retail, lease, or transfer a motor vehicle transferred by a buyer or lessee to a manufacturer pursuant to paragraph (2) of subdivision (d) of Section 1793.2 or a similar statute of any other state, unless the nature of the nonconformity experienced by the original buyer or lessee is clearly and conspicuously disclosed to the prospective buyer, lessee, or transferee, the nonconformity is corrected, and the manufacturer warrants to the new buyer, lessee, or transferee in writing for a period of one year that the motor vehicle is free of that nonconformity.

(2) Except for the requirement that the nature of the nonconformity be disclosed to the transferee, paragraph (1) does not apply to the transfer of a motor vehicle to an educational institution if the purpose of the transfer is to make the motor vehicle available for use in automotive repair courses.

(Amended by Stats. 2000, Ch. 679, Sec. 1. Effective January 1, 2001.)

1794. (a) Any buyer of consumer goods who is damaged by a failure to comply with any obligation under this chapter or under an implied or express warranty or service contract may bring an action for the recovery of damages and other legal and equitable relief.

(b) The measure of the buyer’s damages in an action under this section shall include the rights of replacement or reimbursement as set forth in subdivision (d) of Section 1793.2, and the following:

(1) Where the buyer has rightfully rejected or justifiably revoked acceptance of the goods or has exercised any right to cancel the sale, Sections 2711, 2712, and 2713 of the Commercial Code shall apply.

(2) Where the buyer has accepted the goods, Sections 2714 and 2715 of the Commercial Code shall apply, and the measure of damages shall include the cost of repairs necessary to make the goods conform.

(c) If the buyer establishes that the failure to comply was willful, the judgment may include, in addition to the amounts recovered under subdivision (a), a civil penalty which shall not exceed two times the amount of actual damages. This subdivision shall not apply in any class action under Section 382 of the Code of Civil Procedure or under Section 1781, or with respect to a claim based solely on a breach of an implied warranty.

(d) If the buyer prevails in an action under this section, the buyer shall be allowed by the court to recover as part of the judgment a sum equal to the aggregate amount of costs and expenses, including attorney’s fees based on actual time expended, determined by the court to have been reasonably incurred by the buyer in connection with the commencement and prosecution of such action.

(e) (1) Except as otherwise provided in this subdivision, if the buyer establishes a violation of paragraph (2) of subdivision (d) of Section 1793.2, the buyer shall recover damages and reasonable attorney’s fees and costs, and may recover a civil penalty of up to two times the amount of damages.

(2) If the manufacturer maintains a qualified third-party dispute resolution process which substantially complies with Section 1793.22, the manufacturer shall not be liable for any civil penalty pursuant to this subdivision.

(3) After the occurrence of the events giving rise to the presumption established in subdivision (b) of Section 1793.22, the buyer may serve upon the manufacturer a written notice requesting that the manufacturer comply with paragraph (2) of subdivision (d) of Section 1793.2. If the buyer fails to serve the notice, the manufacturer shall not be liable for a civil penalty pursuant to this subdivision.

(4) If the buyer serves the notice described in paragraph (3) and the manufacturer complies with paragraph (2) of subdivision (d) of Section 1793.2 within 30 days of the service of that notice, the manufacturer shall not be liable for a civil penalty pursuant to this subdivision.

(5) If the buyer recovers a civil penalty under subdivision (c), the buyer may not also recover a civil penalty under this subdivision for the same violation.

(Amended by Stats. 1992, Ch. 1232, Sec. 9. Effective January 1, 1993.)